Author Archives: fvlcmarketing

PODCAST: Fox Valley Law Center Update: Immigration Update with Mary Helen Reyna

ICE is self-directed to use prosecutorial discretion in focusing on public safety and threats to society

ICE is self-directed to use prosecutorial discretion in focusing on public safety and threats to society

The Fox Valley Law Center Update is an Internet radio podcast focused on sharing news, tips and trends in complex legal issues facing our friends and neighbors in Chicago area. This series features attorneys and guests of The Fox Valley Law Center, the general practice law firm conveniently located at the Westfield Fox Valley Law Center in Aurora, Illinois. Today’s guest is Mary Helen Reyna offers updates in immigration law including the new Illinois temporary visitor’s driver’s license.

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Interview questions and topics covered on this show:

1) Immigration reform is frequently in the news and is the topic of political debate. What is the latest?

2) The issuance of Illinois Temporary Visitor Drivers Licenses allows undocumented residents to drive.

3) With news of Justin Bieber’s arrest, people have been talking about criminal law and deportation.

4) ICE is self-directed to use prosecutorial discretion in focusing on public safety and threats to society.

Mary Helen Reyna

Mary Helen Reyna

Mary Helen Reyna graduated from The Ohio State University in Columbus, OH with a degree in criminal justice and a minor in Spanish.  She graduated from DePaul University College of Law in 2006 and was admitted to the Illinois State Bar during the same year. Mary Helen focuses her practice on immigration law and assisting immigrant clients in a variety of issues affecting the immigrant community of the south and west suburbs. Mary Helen regularly volunteers her legal services.

Visit Fox Valley Law Center online for more about the firm.

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Medical Marijuana in Illinois: Resources for understanding the Medical Cannabis Pilot Program

Three Illinois state agencies are working to establish rules for patient ID cards and policies and procedures for dispensaries.

Three Illinois state agencies are working to establish rules for patient ID cards and policies and procedures for dispensaries.

The Medical Cannabis Pilot Program (“MCPP”)[i] is one of the most discussed new 2014 laws in Illinois. What people should know is that despite the law taking effect January 1, it will be some time before people who qualify for medical marijuana will be able to obtain their medicine. The debate about medical marijuana has Americans talking. Some high-profile leaders are changing their minds with many Americans and residents of Illinois who find medical cannabis a worthy alternative to traditional pharmaceuticals and traditional Western medical treatments of certain conditions. Washington and Colorado went further and legalized marijuana beyond a medical treatment and residents may use marijuana for recreational use. Because opinions and what is known about marijuana for medicine or recreation, Illinois law makers voted to approve a somewhat restrictive and detailed pilot program and it will take some time to answer questions and approve policies and procedures for the new law.

Three Illinois state agencies are working to establish rules for patient ID cards and policies and procedures for dispensaries.

The Illinois Department of Public Health (“DPH”) is the agency writing administrative rules for the new program. DPH wants Illinois residents to understand the WARNING: “The State of Illinois is warning that it will not be legal for anyone to grow, offer to provide, or to possess, medical cannabis until licenses have been issued and the program is up and running.[ii]” Among its responsibilities, DPH is considering additional medical conditions to the list of many contained in a published analysis of the law on the Marijuana Policy Project (“MPP”)[iii]. Here is a link to An Overview of Illinois’ Medical Marijuana Law. Interested Illinois residents may click here with comments and suggestions about the pilot program.

The concept of the new law being a pilot program is also well-explained in the overview. “Why is it called a “pilot program?” MPP answers, “The law was created with a “sunset” provision, meaning that if the legislature does not review the program or create a new law, the program will cease to operate four years from the date it goes into effect.[iv]” As Illinois State agencies implement the new law its future existence is not certain. People who want to operate dispensaries and participate in the program should take their civic duties seriously and communicating with elected representatives, especially through easy contact forms on their websites, is certainly a good idea.

Be careful not to break the law when seeking to become a medical cannabis dispensary.

The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (“IDFPR”) is the Illinois agency that manages the licensing and regulation of professionals including physicians. Doctors interested in applying to operate legal dispensary operations must obey strict rules. A recent news release on the IDFPR website, titled, “State Urges Caution towards Medical Cannabis Clinics,” mentions a formal complaint filed against a Chicago doctor, “The complaint alleges that on the day Dr. Murray opened the ‘Good Intentions’ clinic, he and a coworker were offering potential patients ‘pre-approval’ to obtain medical cannabis if they paid a $99 registration fee. Under the Medical Practice Act, such conduct is unprofessional as it is misleading.[v]” A physician could lose their license to practice medicine in the State of Illinois for breaking the new law.

The Illinois Department of Agriculture is the third agency working to implement the new law. Their responsibilities include the regulation of the medical cannabis cultivation facilities. Working with the IDFPR, the Department of Agriculture will work to ensure the medical cannabis growers are in compliance with rules and regulations of growing medical marijuana for the dispensaries. The Department of Agriculture also has a link to their resources regarding the law and their role in regulating cultivation centers.

How can the Fox Valley Law Center help with the new medical marijuana law?

Fox Valley Law Center attorneys receive a high volume of inquiries about the new law. From the would be patients of clinics to people wondering about possessing marijuana, to the attorneys who assist physicians who want to incorporate dispensary clinics in their practices, we can help answer your questions and keep everyone in compliance with the law. To talk to an attorney, please call and make an appointment at the Fox Valley Law Center by dialing 630-236-2222 or simply stop in and see us at our office conveniently located at the second floor of the Westfield Fox Valley Mall in Aurora. We are here during mall hours. You can also learn more about our firm when you “Like” us on Facebook and “Follow” us on Twitter!

 

Illinois Concealed Firearms Act: Do You Qualify?

"IN DROVES: Thousands of gun owners have spent their own time and money to sign-up for concealed carry." Imagae and article with statistics by Illinois Watchdog, "In Illinois, shoot first, enroll in Obamacare later," by Ben Yount, Jan. 15, 2014.

“IN DROVES: Thousands of gun owners have spent their own time and money to sign-up for concealed carry.” Image and article with statistics by Illinois Watchdog, “In Illinois, shoot first, enroll in Obamacare later,” by Ben Yount, Jan. 15, 2014.

In their recent news article, “In Illinois, shoot first, enroll in Obamacare later,” the Illinois Watchdog (formerly Illinois Statehouse News) reported that more people are applying for concealed carry permits than for Obamacare. “The Illinois State Police expect as many as 400,000 people to apply for gun permits. If the pace continues, Illinois will see 240,000 applications in just three months.” The article also suggests, “The only way Obamacare can get close to those kind of numbers is factoring in the state’s massive explosion in Illinois’ Medicaid population.”[i]

The Fox Valley Law Center can answer your questions about concealed carry eligibility.

The Illinois Concealed Firearms Act authorizes the issuance of licenses for the concealed carry of handguns and other firearms.  If you are at least 21 years old, have a currently valid Illinois Firearm Owners Identification (FOID) Card, and have completed an approved firearms training course, you may qualify for a license if you answer “no” to the following questions:

1. Are you disqualified from owning or possessing a firearm under state or federal law?  Or do you have a pending case that could lead to the disqualification from owning or possessing a firearm?

Common reasons for being disqualified from owning or possessing a handgun under Illinois or federal law include: (a) a conviction for a felony offense; (b) conviction for domestic battery; or, (c) convictions for certain drug and narcotics offenses.

2. Within the past 5 years (from the date of your concealed carry application), have you been convicted or found guilty of:

a. A misdemeanor offense involving use or threat of physical violence?

This could include misdemeanor offenses for assault, battery or domestic battery.  If you have been placed on court supervision for one of these offenses, you may not qualify.

b.  2 or more violations related to driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol, drugs, or intoxicating compounds?

3. Have you been in residential or court-ordered treatment for alcoholism, alcohol detoxification, or drug treatment within the past 5 years?

If you answered “yes” to any of the above questions, you may not qualify for a concealed firearm license.  Once issued, a concealed firearm license is valid for 5 years.  If a person is issued a license and then changes addresses or names, the person must notify the proper authorities within 30 days of the change.

The Fox Valley Law Center is conveniently located in the Westfield Valley Shopping Mall.  To schedule a consultation, call us at (630) 236-2222.


[i] Illinois Watchdog: In Illinois, shoot first, enroll in Obamacare later, by Ben Yount, Jan. 15, 2014.

Get ready for new Illinois laws to take effect at midnight January 1, 2014

Call the Fox Valley Law Center at 630-236-2222 if you have any questions about the new laws.

Call the Fox Valley Law Center at 630-236-2222 if you have any questions about the new laws.

More than 200 plus new laws take effect at midnight on January 1 in Illinois. Some of the new laws as reported in this video by WGN news include a ban on incandescent light bulbs, the legalization medical marijuana, the concealed carry law for firearms. Several of the news laws are somewhat complex, and for example, the new handgun law identifies several places where people in Illinois may not carry a concealed handgun at playgrounds, forest preserves and restaurants. It is important to do your research if you are one of the Illinois residents who will apply for the new handgun permit so you do not inadvertently carry a gun in a prohibited location. Those who violate the new law may be subject to criminal penalties. Here is a link to a table listing all the new laws courtesy of WGN TV.

The medical marijuana law is rather complex for both patients and medical providers.

While the new medical marijuana law goes into effect on January 1, it will take some time for patience to gain access to their medicine. By April 2014 the state agencies regulating the licensing of dispensaries and cultivators. The new law allows a patient with a prescription to legally purchase no more than 2.5 ounces of marijuana over any two-week period. Unlike medical marijuana laws in other states, the new Illinois law requires that the prescribing doctor have a prior medical relationship with the patient who must have a serious or chronic condition for which the marijuana is prescribed. This new law is a pilot program and Illinois lawmakers are already proposing revisions to the law. The marijuana cultivators and dispensaries are highly regulated under the new law by the Illinois Department of Financial and Regulation. Here is a link to the Illinois Medical Cannabis Act Reference Sheet provided by the Marijuana Policy Project organization. If you have any questions please, give the Fox Valley Law Center a call and one of the lawyers can explain this and the many other laws that take effect January 1.

New laws allow Illinois drivers to speed up to 70 and some of the youngest drivers can register to vote at age 17.

Driving in Illinois will change somewhat in 2014 as several speed limits in non-urban areas increase to 70 miles per hour. While driving you will need to use hands free electronic devices if you want to communicate with the world outside your vehicle, so you may need to take the plunge and learn how to connect your device to the vehicle’s blue tooth system if you are so equipped.

As you drop your kids off at school, you may be pleased to know a new federal law regarding food allergies provides that Epi pens should be on hand for the aid of children with food allergies. If your children are seniors in high school, they may become politically active and start voting at age 17! If you are divorced you will be surprised to learn that a new family law requires parents with joint-custody to offer the other parent the option of temporary care before taking a child to a third party care giver like daycare.

If you are an employer, you may also want to spend some time on New Year’s Day reviewing new laws.

Business owners will enjoy reviewing several of the new laws. Professionals licensed to practice their craft by the Illinois Department of Professional and Financial Regulation will be glad to know their home addresses may no longer be printed on the licenses that are required to be displayed to customers. An employer may also access an employee’s social networking website such as Facebook for professionally used accounts for which the employer has liability for the employee under certain laws. This is another example of why in 2014 if you are unsure of how a new law works you should make a call to a lawyer who can explain how new laws may affect you.

To talk to an attorney about the new laws in Illinois, please call and make an appointment at the Fox Valley Law Center by dialing 630-236-2222 or simply stop in and see us at our office conveniently located at the second floor of the Westfield Fox Valley Mall in Aurora. We are here during mall hours. You can also learn more about our firm when you “Like” us on Facebook and “Follow” us on Twitter!